Global Conditions: The World’s Problems,
in the year 2001

(Think Globally and Act Locally; And while your at it, Act Globally before it is too late!)

GLOBAL DISPARITIES . . . It is estimated that industrialized countries hold 97% of all PATENTS, and global corporations 90% of all technology and product patents. More than 80% of the FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT in developing and transition economies goes to just 20 countries, with China getting the lion's share. See more below.

Listed here are some facts about the Global Conditions and World Problems. IAED is looking for solutions. We create and make happen a synergy between business corporations and business people who have a strong sense of "social responsibility." Our Members participate in solutions to these problems. If you would like to join IAED in the creation of solutions, contact us directly. The United Nations addresses all these conditions and looks for solutions, in agreement with the 188 UN Country Missions. We monitor the UN’s efforts and work with them in countries on projects that can have a positive economic and social development solution. The UN is crippled by current U.S.A. policy of refusing to pay their legally agreed fees.

Your positive ideas and thoughts are important to us. Join others with discussions and comments from people around the world. If you have firsthand knowledge of these conditions and some solutions in your countries, please join our

Discussion Bulletin Board Click here to post YOUR message on IAED's Online Message Board.

or you may contact IAED directly: please send us your comments directly to IAED.

The end results of our efforts are charitable specific projects which have long lasting positive social and economic benefits.

We support business and we believe business has a caring “human face.” If your business believes this also, join IAED...we can help your business while you are expanding your business globally and making a positive contribution to global development.

Most of these conditions, one would think are outside of the United States of America and a long way away from Americans concerns. Maybe Boutros Boutros-Ghali was correct when he told the US Government that “now that the USA is the Leader of the World, (Super Power, Super Rich,) the whole rest of the world will be watching to see the kind of leader the USA is; compassionate or greedy mean-spirited bully?” ( – NY Times) If America is going to sell its kind of globalization, capitalism and culture to the rest of the countries, it might well consider its own policies and actions of compassion to its own citizens. The current right-wing "no one is entitled to it" attitude and entitlement-dismantle policies (Contract with America) implemented out of Washington, and many corporations actions become "negative images" and a hard-sell to the rest of the world.

June 13, 2000: The USA Congress is pressing for tax relief for the rich in estate taxes.
UNICEF released the following: USA now has
13.5 Million children in poverty, just behind Mexico in the World Poverty listings. (USA "Entitlement" Strategy)

We are developing this section ...stay tuned! We see these issues not as problems but as goals for opportunities of our members to solve through sustainable economic development. IAED focuses on Plans for Action.

Of the 6 Billion people on Earth, 5 Billion of them live in either transition of developing economies; 3 billion of them live on under two ($2) dollars a day; 2 billion of them live on under a ($1) dollar a day. Approximately 2 Billion of them do not have access to any form of power; 1.5 Billion do not have access to clean water; 3 Billion do not have access to sanitation. Hundreds of thousands of kids are not in school and too many are already "street children." The next 25 years will add another 2 Billion people to the world (some are estimating a double of our population by 2030/50). The probability is that we will not have 5 Billion in development, but 7 Billion people in development.

Over 10 thousand babies are born every day!

There is an environmental crisis. We are losing forests at a rate of an acre a second and have been doing so for the past 20 to 30 years! The environment is not in great shape. The impact on weather and the environment by carbon emissions is clear to most of us.

By the middle of this century, we will need to double the food that we have now produce with the same land.

Water for our children will be the sort of issue that oil was for some years ago. There are estimates from experts that the next world wars will be fought over water and food.

The gap between rich and poor - between countries and within countries - is not diminishing, it is increasing!

We are doing a lousy job in terms of the emancipation and the education of women. (Witness the disaster of the just completed "UN Special General Assembly on Beijing+5 Women's Conference Follow-up at the UN 9 June 2000.)

We currently have 35 Wars going on right now. People are being killed every day. 85 to 95 per centof the casualties are women and children.

We are looking at a world which is gradually getting worse and worse and worse!

- Quotes from James Wolfensohn, World Bank (March 1999)

The United Nations Web sites...
Peace & Security
Economic & Social Development
International Law
Human Rights
Humanitarian Affairs

Areas of concern . . .

IAED looks for, and works towards, positive solutions to these problems wherever they exist in the world.
If you are interested in helping us please contact us.

Some special KEY WEB LINKS:

Globaloney!

Job's

Economic Refugees (new group - still not tracked by the UN in 2000)

Aids HIV

Aging

Armaments (see War)

Capitalism and the "New World Economic Order"

Children

Hunger

Homeless

Television & Violence

Debt

Disarmament

The Armaments Industry

Landmines

Drugs

Economic Development (see also Economic Refugees)

Education

Employment

Energy

Environment

Ethics & Contracts

    Social Contract

    Environmental Contract

    Economic Contract

    Political Contract

Food (see Hunger)

Globalization

Global Disparities

Health Care

Hunger (see Food)

Human Rights

Housing

See Homeless

International Criminal Court ICC

Internet (see Worldwide WEB)

Peace

Hague Appeal for Peace

Abolition 2000

Canadian Peace Alliance

Poor (Poverty)

Pollution

Population

Science & Technology

Social Development

Space

Starvation

Sustainable Development

Refugees:

Environmental Refugees

Economic Refugees

War Refugees

Rural Problems

Farmers

Transnational Corporations

Urban Problems

Wars (currently some 40 countries are fighting and targeting Women and Children, which are 90% of the casualties)

Water

Worldwide Web (See Internet)

World Trade Organization (Secretive Legal Body minus and people inputs)

Women's Issues:

Violence Against Woman

Youth

Children

Diseases

Hunger

Homeless

Television & Violence

We are working on this list....

If we have missed any critical ones...please let us know.


These conditions make up the Thematic and Substantive Issues the United Nations focuses on. For a network of NGOs inside the United Nations and Worldwide who are concerned about these problems, go to The NGOs Network


Aging:

Each month the worlds older population increases by 1.2 million! By 2020, 1.4 billion persons will be over the age of 60, an increase of 240% since 1980 with the fastest growth in developing countries. By 2025, worldwide life expectancy will reach 73 years . . . a 50% improvement on the 1955 average of only 48 years . . . a quality of life challenge.

Every month one million more people 60 or over are added to the population, three-quarters of them in the developing world. 3/4 of all those who have attained the age of 75 are alive and walking around today.

Middle age growth is decreasing, leaving a growing youth age group. There could be potential problems (conflicts) between the elderly and the youth.

What about Social Security? What about all those other countries who do not have Social Security?

How do we build sustainable communities for all?

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AIDS/HIV:

One African country is losing one teacher a week to AIDS.

If something is not done about Africa's AIDS condition soon, we might see whole countries wiped out! What makes us in the North think we are not in direct harms way? With travelers only hours away by jet, we need to rethink our priorities in relation to corporate profits and drugs that could assist.

Remember, it is women who are least resistant to AIDS and immune diseases.

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Armaments:

Note: The current 2000 Presidential candidate George W. Bush, is asking for more money for Armaments when elected. And remember, we have no money available for Health Care in the U.S.A.

“Overkill. In 1995 the world spent more than US$1.5 million each minute on defense - a total of nearly $800 billion. The cost of achieving basic social services for all has been estimated at $40 billion a year for ten years - a total of $400 billion. That is half of what was spent globally on the military in 1995 alone. More than 110 million landmines were buried in 68 countries. with an equal number stockpiled around the world. More than 2 million children died as a result of armed conflicts in the past decade, in part because of landmines. Half the worlds governments pay more to guard against military attack than fight the enemies of health. In the early 1990s Angola, Ethiopia, Myanmar, Qatar, and Yemen spent about twice as much on the military as they did on health and education; the Syrian Arab Republic spent almost four times as much. Thirty leading industrialized countries exported nearly $22 billion worth of conventional weapons in 1995, - 94% of the world total. The USA exported 51% of the worlds weapons, followed by the Russian Federation (13%) , Germany (8%), and the United Kingdom (6%). There were close to 22 million people serving in the armed forces worldwide in 1995, two-thirds of them from developing countries. Kuwait spent $2,091 per capita on the military in 1995, South Africa spent $88, MEXICO $30, VIET NAM $12, AND Costa Rico $6. Official development assistance provided by the United States in 1995 was only 3% of what the country spent on defense that year.”

- Human Development Report 1997, Commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme.

"40% of the U. S. Military personnel are on Food stamps." heard on TV show March 2000)

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Capitalism and the "New World Economic Order":

"From the Ruling Class, Meet Your Next President" Headlines of NY Times Sunday, March 12, 2000.

"The 2000 Presidential Campaign shows clearly how anyone out side the "Establishment" (on the peoples side) is not allowed to participate in Democracy in America." – Airiana Huffington on TV show after the elimination of the contenders Bill Bradly and Arizona's McCaine.

The question for America and most of the "structurally adjusted" countries under globalization is; Do you get a Democracy or a Plutotocary? Some professors and serious wealthly citizens have called it an "Economic Dictatorship."

The richest 400 Americans are now worth $1 Trillion, which is more than the total GDP of China.

2 Americans have more wealth and income than over 200 Million other American citizens.

Even Capitalism (and the wait for "trickle down" concept of economics of the 1% of the rich) is beginning to be questioned. Does Capitalism work? Seems YES for the 1-2% and NO for the other 98-99% worldwide.

"The Deficiencies of the Global Capitalist System:

1. The uneven distribution of benefits.

2. The instability of the financial system.

3. The incipient threat of the global monopolies and oligopolies.

4. The ambiguous role of the state.

5. The question of values and social cohesion."

- By George Soros in The Atlantic Monthly, January 1998 issue.


American citizens from religious groups/churches to farmer militias and many business leaders, professors and intellectuals in between, are all speaking out about the negative impacts of globalization on the Developed Countries and the rest of the world. Even Mr. Rubin, past Treasury Secretary, on the US News & World Report new TV series on Globalization in 1999 said, "We must do something about the growing 'gap' between rich and poor in America.

The "Contract with America:" Whos America? Whos Contract?

See some of the alternative approaches: "Ownership Solution" and "Binary Economics" discussions under way in America. See also Globaloney.

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Children & Homeless:

Some one million (1,000,000) American kids are growing up homeless in the United States of America. This is at the point of an epidemic. There seems to be an attitude of “they are not entitled to it!” Or “they should get out and work for it!” We need to “cut the entitlement programs and the welfare state,” along with “cut taxes for the wealthy.” (Steven Forbes, USA Presidential candidate.) Cutting of $90 Billion dollars of Welfare support and the dumping of thousands of single mothers and children out on to the streets. All while “Greed is good!” movies are popular and the “The Rich are rapidly separating themselves from the Poor” according to the UNDP’s latest Human Development Report for 1998.

Twelve million children under the age of five die each year in developing countries, mainly from preventable diseases.

What is the homeless situation for children in your countries? Write to us.

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Children & Hunger:

“Crisis at Christmas” in America!

According to a television show aired in the United States of America, “Crisis at Christmas” CBS Channel 2, December 4, 1998, at 7:30 PM EST: Over 15 million children are starving and going hungry in the United States of America. All while globalization is destroying USA’s farmers and America's wheat production is being transferred to India, and other foods moving around the world for the cheapest labor, by the transnational food companies ("we are the bread basket of the world") who are "feeding the world."

Only two oil companies, on one day, reported spending $80 billion dollars to merge their companies. Watch the New York Times and the London Financial Times each day to see how many Billions of Dollars are available for rich companies to buy each other. Then note the amount of money they are willing to give back for the world's problems even in the countries where they are headquartered or conduct their own businesses.

In 1999, according to the IRS official who's job is to monitor Wall Street, "over $2,000,000,000 (that's trillion) dollars moves through Wall Street EVERY DAY!

IAED is interested in the effects of the “globalization” process, and the “structural adjustment” policies of the World Bank and the IMF International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization's policies on the creation of an increasing number of “Economic Refugees” and the overall impact on children.

PS: Probably around 3 Billion people are either starving or barely existing on $1 tom $2 dollars a day.

If you are aware of similar conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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Children: Television & Violence:

WHO estimates that some 30 million children are abused. Sexual abuse was inflicted on 34 percent of girls and 20 percent of the boys in 19 countries children, up to 14 years old.

Some 130 million children are out of school . . .

By age 18, according to one estimate , a youngster will have seen 200,000 acts of violence on television. (We Americans can't understand why all those other countries don't like our "culture"?)

TV Guide looked at 10 channels on one normal 18-hour day and found 1,846 individual acts of violence, including 40,000 murders - and every hour of prime time carries six to eight acts of violence.

Our children watch astonishing 5,000 hours by the first grade and 19,000 hours by the end of high school - more time than they spend in the classroom.

CBS News reported that in 1940 the seven top problems in public schools were identified by teachers as talking out of turn, chewing gum, making noise, running in the halls, cutting in line, dress-code infractions and littering. By 1980, the seven top problems had been identified as suicide, assault, robbery, rape, drug abuse and pregnancy.

Some 80% of Americans feel that TV violence is harmful to our society and that there is too much of it in our entertainment.

Some studies indicate that children who watched a lot of TV violence at age 8 years of age have higher propensity to commit violent crime by age 30, including the beating of their own children.

If you are aware of similar conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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Debt:

Africa's Debt is Staggering . . .
some have called it "Debtors Economic Prison."

(UN estimates it to be a quarter of a Billion Dollars every week.)

Example of Only One Country . . . and they are currently in an environmental disaster situation (Flooding as of March 2000)

MOZAMBIQUE DEBT PAYMENTS WERE SUSPENDED BY PARIS CLUB OF GOVERNMENT DONORS to whom $3.4B (40%) of Mozambique's debt is owed, this week (3/15/2000). Several countries intend to forgive Mozambique's remaining debt. Aside from govts, intl. finance institutions hold another $2.1B (25%) of its debt. Mozambique received some debt relief in June 1999 ($3.7B), which resulted in annual payments dropping from $112M to ~ $73M. It's debt service has been $1.4 million a week, mostly to World Bank & IMF. The World Bank has given Mozambique a $2.5 million emergency loan & intends to give another $15M.

If you are concerned with these conditions in your countries, please contact us, and send us information.

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Disarmament's: (see Armaments)

"At Best Static, Perhaps Worsening" – Chairman Raimundo Gonzalez of Chile in his concluding statement to the General Assembly's First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) 2000

If you are concerned with these conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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Drugs:

The war on drugs is not working! But is sure costing!!

Just type in "Drugs" in any search engine on the web. There is an over abundance of proof all over the place. Or check your local prisons full of people who have been incarcerate for minor drug charges (even women with children); Usually Blacks not Whites. Although blacks constitute 13 percent of all monthly drug users, they represent 35 percent of all arrests for drug possession. 55 percent of convictions and 74 percent of prison sentences. Approximately 67 percent of crack users are white or Hispanic. Yet persons convicted of crack possession in federal courts in 1994 were 85 percent black, 10 percent white and 5 percent Hispanic.

"The War on Drugs began over 10 years ago . . . it has hugely misfired . . . School systems deteriorate while tax dollars build more new prisons . . . Municipal police forces have grown so militarized that drug warrants are served in armored carriers. Young mothers are imprisoned for years for simple drug possession . . . In their obsession to control drug use by making war on it, federal and state legislators have turned the world's greatest democracy into its largest prison system. If drugs are bad, the drug war is worse." – NY Times March 13, 1999 editorial.

U.S.A. now leads the world in its citizens imprisoned . . . over 2,000,000 (that's millions).

Read your local newspapers about the corruption it deals to our law enforcement officers. Then there is all the deaths it creates. There is the laundering of money through offshore island secret tax havens; which we can't pursue because if the banks open up the accounts information we will find all our major corporations and rich in there. How do you think those tax havens got set up in the first place?

Illegal drugs seriously threaten American society? . . . Federal statistics show that alcohol users (heavy and light) outnumber marijuana users ten to one. They outnumber hard drug users over 100 to one. And they kill more people on the highways or in their own homes while under the influence.

Good place to start: http://www.prdi.org

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Economic Development:

Effective economic development is sustainable development because it can (could) solve all the problems listed on this site. Also economic development can not exist without all the infrastructure necessary for its success. It is difficult to get effective social development without economic development. Effective economic development is the nervous system (DNA) of an effective society. All systems of an effective society are interconnected. Mess up one and you mess up the others! There is a Ying and Yang effect to economics . . . a sense of "for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction."

Without moral and ethics . . . no effective infrastructure. . . No infrastructure, no development.

Ineffective infrastructures means constant fine tuning to get it right. And that means continuos problems (economic cycles.)

– Dr. Larry T. Gell, Based on 40 years of real-world economic experience in every part of the globe.

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Education:

The best part of a billion people are still illiterate and some 130 million children are out of school.

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Employment: (Jobs)

China: It is a lot like the U.S.A. Has about 250 million people workers. China's are concentrated on the East coast of China. The other 1 Billion are on the farms (rural areas.) It is estimated that in 20-30 years the world's population will double to 12 Billion people, and that the 85% of the people living in the rural areas will flood into the cities looking for jobs, food and water. The greatest problems will be in the developing countries.

Some estimate the next great world war will be fought over water and food.

Water flowing from China in the Himalayan mountains through India to Bangladesh has been dammed by India. India cuts off the flow of water to Bangladesh in the Summer, turning Bangladesh into a near desert. Then opens up the dam in the winter monsoon season to flood the country. A water and Dam project seems a long way from employment and jobs . . . but is directly connected.

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Energy:

Energy drives the global economic system. Without cheap energy, the developing countries can not develop.

Current continuing oil price rise (3/14/2000) and past oil crisis all point towards need for alternative sources. However, it is not a shortage of actual oil, but economic decisions of "key players" (Texas included, which benefits) that keeps profits redistributed. Then there is the Caspian Sea find; Some estimate it to be bigger than the middle east reserves. There is also the Gulf of Mexico reserves. A check at the Lamont-(LDEO) Labs at Columbia University shows even greater reserves around the planet. Global marketing thrives on sacristy and price dominance.

The wealthiest 20% of the world's people use 58% of the world's energy and consume 45% of all meat and fish. They own 87% of the world's vehicles and have access to 74% of all telephone lines.

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Environment:

"Now, humanity is at war with nature and the environment." – French philosopher Michael Serres 2000.

"One recent estimate is that less than 20% of North American and European companies can be described as proactive in their commitment to improving environmental performance in alignment with sustainable development." – World Resources Institute, Washington, D.C.

"Most serious threat to the environment is the "slow downfall" of bio-diversity (ecosystems, species and genes.)" – Thomas Odhiambo, President of University of Tropical Medicine of Kenya.

The Ozone Hole:

The hole in the ozone layer over the Antarctic, which has occurred annually since 1990, is as large as ever according to the UN Environment Programme. It is about twice the area of China. If all countries live up to their commitments under the 1987 Montreal Protocol to control the emission gases that deplete the ozone layer, scientists project that the hole will close around 2050. Meanwhile, the effect of the missing ozone can be measured: levels of ultraviolet radiation in New Zealand during summer is 12 per cent more than it was ten years ago.

While the major polluters are putting out a lot of spin on why it is not so . . . be sure to use hats and sun blocks!! Or, stay out of the Sun. PS: We northern car drivers (especially those sports jeep vans/trucks) are big contributors right along with the big corporations . . . we're partners in this one.

[Under the new "capitalism entitlement attitude" . . . "what me care, I am too busy making money for myself, let the New Zealander's worry about it. Unless it effects the wool or food we eat from their sheep.]

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Farmers:

There are people (children) starving right in the U.S.A. In New York City it is estimated that 54% of the children are born into poverty. Seems the farmers could fix this problem? But, they are too busy figuring out how to survive themselves . . .

It is estimated that there are over 252 Armed Militias active in the USA. The KKK is very active even in states in the North such as Indiana. And there are frequent recruitment meetings of Militias in the biggest cites in America (even New York City).

America has gone from 85% of it's farmers in 1900 to 1-2% in 2000. And key food crops have been systematically shifted around the globe for economic advantages of large corporations. This same situation is being suggested by Globalization and Structural Adjustment for the developing countries.

Even "Terminator Seeds" are being imposed on farmers locally and globally. In defense of those seeds (if there is one), is that the yields are much greater, for a years crops.

Genetically Engineered food is a whole other area of great concern and little knowledge.

Most people upset with current conditions can trace their complaints to the unfairness of the economic condition they find themselves in. If their protests go unheard, they become labeled "terrorists" by their governments.

The costs (to any country) of not fixing these types of problems can be much greater than the short sightedness and short term profits of a few corporations.

IAED looks for solutions to these type of problems. Help yourself, help us.

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Food:

Agriculture subsidies total $350 Billion world wide, which equals twice the agriculture exports of developing nations from 1996 to 1998!

Accelerating population growth and potential food shortages.

Globalization changes the food issues dramatically. Wheat growing in surplus in America is shifted to India by transnational food corporations.

Genetic engineered foods.

Terminator Seeds.

WTO, Intellectual property rights and the patenting of local foods of the developing countries.

Who controls the world's food seed bank?

IAED looks for solutions to these type of problems. Help yourself, help us.

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Globalization: (The growing "Gap" between rich and poor.)

As the big Red Communist "Evil Bear Empire" and the "Sleeping Dragon" get in bed (forming economic strategic alliances) with the Good West, it leaves only a hand full of very tiny but definitely "Rogue States" to focus on. Hardly a "realistic" threat. That's potentially good for world peace and nuclear disaster. But, is it good for all the little countries (now unsupervised (stabilized) by the "big two"), who are warring and killing themselves by the millions all over the globe?

"If this is democracy, then I don't want it. In the Soviet Union at least I had my dignity. Here, we have nothing."
– Citizen of Capitalism; The new democracy of Georgia, (ex Russia)

"Corporations . . . They control vital resources and influence hundreds of millions of lives. They have been responsible for some of the major social and environmental problems the world now faces, and play a predominant role in the production of values and images." – UNESCO's "Sources" magazine January 2000.

Only two Americans; Bill Gates and Warren Buffet have more wealth than over 200, 000,000 + Americans. (That's 200 Million+ people!)

Globalization looks very different when seen, not from the capitals of the West, but from cities and villages of the south, where most of humanity lives. Even from the suburbs of the center of capitalism, New York City, U.S.A. where 54% of the children are born into poverty! In Peru 50% of the population have been living under the poverty line for the last ten years, and two-thirds of laborers or unskilled workers are unemployed or underemployed. Globalization has not abolished work but transformed it, making it another major source of inequality. Which place is the "third world economy?"

We are faced with emerging challenges. The current economic globalization has seen a record concentration of wealth and power in the hands of a very few. A parallel eroding of economic security for the many. Increasing political and cultural fragmentation has given rise to violent conflicts. A booming multi-billion dollar global criminal trade in arms and brutal traficking in women and children are discriminately destroying lives and devastating communities. We are further faced with unrelenting pandemic of HIV/AIDS, which is robbing entire regions of their productive adults, leaving millions of orphans behind. And this is only the tip of the iceberg.

IAED is interested in the effects of the “globalization” process, and the “structural adjustment” policies of the World Bank, the IMF International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade Organization on the creation of an increasing number of “Economic Refugees.”

If you are aware of similar conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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Global Disparities: (More growing "Gap" between rich and poor.)

GLOBAL DISPARITIES . . . It is estimated that industrialized countries hold 97% of all PATENTS, and global corporations 90% of all technology and product patents. More than 80% of the FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT in developing and transition economies goes to just 20 countries, with China getting the lion's share. Globally, 20% of the world's people in the industrialized countries account for about 86% of total private CONSUMPTION EXPENDITURES, while the poorest 20% account for 1.3%. The share of the poorest 20% of the world's people in global income is 1.1% down from 1.4% in 1991. DEBIT RELIEF for the 20 worst affected countries would cost between US$5.5 billion and$7.7 billion, less than the cost of one Stealth bomber. There are 16 CARS per 1,000 people in the developing countries and 405 cars per 1,000 people in the industrialized countries. The developing countries have ONE DOCTOR for every 6,000 people, the industrialized countries have one for every 350 people. In 1998, 26% of people living in the United States had access to the INTERNET but fewer than 1% had access in the developing regions." - UNDP HUMAN DEVELOPMENT REPORT 1999

(Could this be why the current head of the UNDP (Mr. Mark Malloch Brown, ex World Bank officer) wants to change this report over to look more like the Wold Bank's "Economic Development Report" format and away from the "Human Conditions," which seem to be deteriorating? - 3/25/2001)

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Health Care:

    40% of Americans have NO Health Care insurance.

  • $13 billion a year would be needed to ensure basic health and nutrition for all - a fraction of the amount spent in Europe on cigarettes ($50 billion) or alcoholic drinks ($105 billion).

If you are aware of similar conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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Human Rights:

    "America leads the world with over 2 million of its citizens in prisons."

    More women are being incarcerated . . . What is the Impact on children?

    More people are being executed . . . (Texas leads the states with executions).

It's big business in America and cheap labor in some states like Texas. With many corporations "downsized," "restructured" and moved to China; it provides jobs for communities across America as they continue to build more prisons.

The FBI says "DNA is one hundred percent accurate for prosecuting citizens," but the Justice Department and Criminal system (prisons) says "DNA is not accurate enough for release of prisoners."

Human Rights takes a new twist in America with the passing of the Terrorist Act of 1998. Taking away some of the First Amendment Rights guaranteed in the Constitution.

According to the International Organization for Migration, some four million illegal migrants are moved every year by traffickers. They take in between five and seven billion dollars. Many are then used as slave labors.

If you are aware of similar conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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Hunger:

    "Some 790 million to 1 Billion people around the world suffer from hunger"
    EVERY DAY AND NIGHT!

Monsanto Chemical introduces "Terminator food seeds." World Trade Organization operating "secretly" insists on food policies for developing countries.

ADM "Feeds the World" they are the "Bread basket to the world." their words. . . . How are they doing?

About one-fifth of the 4.4 billion people living in developing countries are malnourished

If you are aware of similar conditions in your countries, please send us information.

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International Criminal Court ICC:

    Almost every country in the world wants an International Criminal Court.

All of Europe and most of the world's countries want an ICC. The exceptions are the U.S.A. and a hand full of "rouge states." (See the UN Rome ICC Convention 1999) The U.S.A. has some good arguments against it when they are the world's Super Power and requested to shoulder the global disputes with their armies.

The question is . . . Is the ICC a step in the direction of a single world government?

If you are aware of ICC activities in your countries, please send us information.

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Landmines:

In 1995 alone more than 110 million landmines were buried in 68 countries. with an equal number stockpiled around the world. More than 2 million children died as a result of armed conflicts in the past decade, in part because of landmines.

Landmines are one of the moist widely used weapons in contemporary conflicts...
Landmines are cheap to buy, easy to use, hard to detect, costly and dangerous to remove...
Landmines are used to deliberately keep people from their homes...
Landmines kill or maim every twenty minutes...
The poorest of the poor are most severely affected and are most likely to die from injuries...
Landmine survivors are often totally dependent on immediate family for continued survival...
Landmines deny access to land, farming and food, water sources, schools, medical facilities and pathways...
Landmines NEVER SLEEP!

Some landmines have been designed as small, bright, and colorful butterfly looking plastic toys. Especially attractive to children... and deadly! They are very cheap and can be spread over large areas by aircraft.

At a recent United Nations briefing to the NGOs: “We are proud to announce that this year we have removed a record 100,000 landmines worldwide at a cost of up to $1,000 dollars each.” And on the same program another speaker reported, “During the same time there has been over 2.5 million new land mines deployed worldwide at a cost of $3 dollar each.”

The argument for landmines is, “They slow down an advancing army, and facilitate a safe withdraw for a retreating army.” Actually armies understand landmines and know how to deal with them rather quickly. What landmines actually do, is go on killing and maiming innocent citizens long after any war is concluded.

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Pollution:

It is estimated that by the year 2030 the Worlds population will double to 12 Billion people. 85% of the people living in the rural areas will move into the cities looking for work; creating massive problems for urban planning and management along with the possibility of a crisis in water and food and jobs which could lead to a world war.

One child born in New York City, Paris or London will consume, waste and pollute more in a life time than as many as 50 children born in the average developing country. The wealthiest 20% of the world's people use 58% of the world's energy and consume 45% of all meat and fish. They own 87% of the world's vehicles and have access to 74% of all telephone lines. Poor households typically spend more than half of their income on food.

Still, about one-fifth of the 4.4 billion people living in developing countries are malnourished. A 1986 survey showed that citizens in the USA believed they needed an income of at least $50,000 a year to "fulfill their dreams." By 1994, the figure doubled to $100,000. Public spending on primary and secondary education averages $15,500 per person in Luxembourg, and $57 in China. Public and private spending on health care averages about $2,000 per person in Finland, and $3 in Viet Nam. The average person in North America uses more than twice as much electricity as someone in the European Union, and 14 times more energy than someone in the developing world. An additional $6 billion a year would be needed to achieve universal basic education - about $2 billion less than what is currently spent in the USA alone on cosmetics. An additional $13 billion a year would be needed to ensure basic health and nutrition for all - a fraction of the amount spent in Europe on cigarettes ($50 billion) or alcoholic drinks ($105 billion). An additional $9 billion a year would be required to provide clean water and sanitation worldwide. That is about half the money currently spent on pet food in Europe and the USA. In 1997 the world spent $435 billion on advertising, mostly in Europe, North America and Japan. That is nearly 8 times the amount that was channeled to the developing world in the form of official development assistance (ODA).

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Population:

It is estimated that by the year 2030 the Worlds population will double to 12 Billion people. 85% of the people living in the rural areas will move into the cities looking for work; creating massive problems for urban planning and management along with the possibility of a crisis in water and food and jobs which could lead to a world war.

One child born in New York City, Paris or London will consume, waste and pollute more in a life time than as many as 50 children born in the average developing country. The wealthiest 20% of the world's people use 58% of the world's energy and consume 45% of all meat and fish. They own 87% of the world's vehicles and have access to 74% of all telephone lines. Poor households typically spend more than half of their income on food.

Still, about one-fifth of the 4.4 billion people living in developing countries are malnourished. A 1986 survey showed that citizens in the USA believed they needed an income of at least $50,000 a year to "fulfill their dreams." By 1994, the figure doubled to $100,000. Public spending on primary and secondary education averages $15,500 per person in Luxembourg, and $57 in China. Public and private spending on health care averages about $2,000 per person in Finland, and $3 in Viet Nam. The average person in North America uses more than twice as much electricity as someone in the European Union, and 14 times more energy than someone in the developing world. An additional $6 billion a year would be needed to achieve universal basic education - about $2 billion less than what is currently spent in the USA alone on cosmetics. An additional $13 billion a year would be needed to ensure basic health and nutrition for all - a fraction of the amount spent in Europe on cigarettes ($50 billion) or alcoholic drinks ($105 billion). An additional $9 billion a year would be required to provide clean water and sanitation worldwide. That is about half the money currently spent on pet food in Europe and the USA. In 1997 the world spent $435 billion on advertising, mostly in Europe, North America and Japan. That is nearly 8 times the amount that was channeled to the developing world in the form of official development assistance (ODA).

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Poverty: (The growing "gap" between rich and poor.)

Every day some 67,000 more join the legions of the poor.

Of the nearly 6 billion people on earth, some 1.3 billion make less than $370 a year. About $1.00 a day. The average in rich nations is $21,598. Most live in the developing world - Africa, Asia, and Latin America. But even in the rich nations, there are pockets of poverty. And 7 in 10 of the worlds poor are female.

Most people never escape abject poverty. It denies them their basic needs - food, clothing, and shelter. It can rob them of freedom, dignity, education and good health.

The World Health Organization says, “Poverty wields its destructive influence at every stage of human life, from the moment of conception to the grave. It conspires with the most deadly and painful diseases to bring a wretched existence to all who suffer from it.”

The UNDP United Nations Development Programme human development magazine Choices describes the notion that “the poor are catching up” as ‘a dangerous myth.’ Instead, it states: “We love in a world that has in fact become more polarized economically, both among countries and within them.”

Only two Americans, Bill Gates and Warren Buffet have more wealth than over 200, 000,000 + Americans. (That's 200 Million+)!

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Refugees:

"The problem is monumental...affecting all regions of the world." Francis M. Deng, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Internally Displaced Persons at the UN.

Number of Refugees and others of concern to UNHCR as of 1998:
(The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees)

1950
1.0 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1960
1.4 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1963
1.3 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1970
2.5 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1974
2.4 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1980
8.2 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1985
11.6 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1990
17.2 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1995
26.1 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.
1998
22.7 Million human beings. Mostly women and children.

These numbers represent Refugees mainly from wars. Note the increase in refugees since the 1989 changes in Russian/USA relations. Most of these wars are internal conflicts. The world is willing to standby and watch huge disasters and slaughters of humankind. Missing are the uncounted but growing numbers of:

1. Environmental Natural Disaster Refugees.
2. Environmental Man-Made Disasters Refugees.
3. Economic Refugees (resulting from globalization and economic expansion policies.) A brand new category of refugees.

A few facts:

The number uprooted peoples needing help has grown dramatically throughout this century. Today's refugees and internally displaced are mainly women and children who have lost their homes, families and many of their other human rights.

Women and children, who between them often make up 80+ percent of any refugee population, increasingly become deliberate targets of combatants during conflicts.

Women refugees are often victimized many times over.

Many regions of the world have become vast forests of landmines (see landmines) and victims among civilian populations and refugees number in the hundreds of thousands.

A save and secure home is one of the first human rights a refugee loses.

Millions of children have been killed, wounded or died of starvation and disease in the last couple of decades.

178 countries of the UN believe it is now time for an effective International Criminal Court to hold responsible those who are involved in these kinds of atrocities. Seven countries don't.

“Fifty years after the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the very foundation of refugee protection is under threat. The world is faced with unprecedented numbers of victims of forced displacement. At the same time, many states are denying protection to refugees and asylum seekers , and have ignored the very principles of protection they themselves agreed on.” - Amnesty International

“Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from persecution.” Article 14, Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Who is looking after the the world's estimated 20-30 Million internally displaced persons? The world's displaced people often face a more difficult and hazardous future than refugees.

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Environmental Refugees:

One Hurricane can destroy a country and set it back 25 to 50 years overnight. Honduras is estimated to have right now over 1.4 million homeless refugees as of 12/1/98. Their complete infrastructure has been dismantled overnight.

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Economic Refugees: (New category of refugees not identified by the UN)

This is growing in direct proportion to Globalization. And is a direct effect of Globalization. Examples: The restructuring and "downsizing" of thousands of American corporations since 1980, has displaced 10's of millions of workers. This could have been a major disaster for American stability. Luckily for American workers (and the government), they are resilient. Plus, the corporations new global internet technology also just happened to work for the new entrepreneurial environment forced upon American workers. Don't think the current internet web boom was planned . . . the American government has cut the budget to education since 1980, as part of the dismantlement of the entitlement programs in America. If they were dumping 10's of millions of workers and there were no new jobs (except for McDonalds) you didn't want, or need, to educate them. Proof; in 2000 the U.S.A. has to open up immigration to India and others to get their educated internet web workers by the 100's of thousands. Only logical that if they knew it was coming, they would have been educating their own "dumped" workers.

Another example: The Economic Development of Subic Bay in the Philippines. Great for the country. Great for some workers. But, displaces thousands of local people. It is not as easy for people in developing countries to recover as fast as American workers.

As globalization and economic development expands into the developing countries, their cities, their jungles and forests, they are displacing millions of people. Un-accounted-for economic refugees!

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Space:

We are going deeper into space and we are going to Mars soon!

"The United States was not built by those who waited and rested and wished to look behind them. This country was concurred by those who moved forward, and so will space." - John F. Kennedy 1962

Last year, 1998, there was more commercial launches from Cape Canaveral than either civil or military space flights combined! And there were many more from launch pads outside of the USA. The forecast is not only to continue but accelerate. The USA is building a second east coast Space Launch Center in Northern Virginia.

US Government passes the "Commercial Space Act of 1998" on October 20, 1999.

UNISPACE III at the United Nations

space.com

Space Foundation

National Space Society

Kennedy Space Center

NASA and NASA Headquarters

Cape Canaveral

Space Frontier Foundation

FAA Administrator for Commercial Space

Celebrate Space Day

Books on Space and Commercialization of space. and another source.

 

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Science & Technology:

There are more scientists, researchers and technologists alive today then have every lived on the planet in all of human history. [See "The Coming Boom: Economic, Political and Social" by Herman Kahn of the Hudson Institute (1982)] That means constant technological changes and inventions in every field. It also means that those countries that are able to manage these new technologies will be the winners in the future. As the developed world economies shift their old production capacities to the developing world, [and move towards the postindustrial societies of the future] this frees up the management capacity needed to focus on the entrepreneurial companies of the future . The U.S.A. is very focused on "Intellectual Property Rights" at the UN. Two other key or major areas of focus at the UN is Ocean Bottoms and Outer Space.

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War: (Target is women and children.)

War s big business! See Armaments.

Prior to World War II 90 % of war casualties were men. With WWII and today's modern warfare thinking . . . 90% of the casualties are targeted women and children. Remember the "bomb" was dropped not on military targets but 2 cities with women and children in them. European cities were bombed flat along with the women and children , not the military bases or concentrations of armies (men.)

More people have been killed in wars since the end of WWII than were killed in both WWI & WWII. 40 countries are at war currently (2000) and targeting women and children.

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Water:

1.5 Billion people lack clean water. . .

“Safe water is the foundation of health, and health is the foundation for development”.

Water is essential. No one can survive without it. For millions of the worlds poorest people fetching water for their daily needs means a long walk, often to a polluted source. Poor sanitation makes a bad situation worse.

The cost is an untold amount of preventable illnesses and millions of premature deaths.
10 million children will die unnecessarily this year from illnesses which can be averted by basic improvements to the water supplies and sanitation.

$9 billion a year would be required to provide clean water and sanitation worldwide. That is about half the money currently spent on pet food in Europe and the USA. In 1997 the world spent $435 billion on advertising, mostly in Europe, North America and Japan. That is nearly 8 times the amount that was channeled to the developing world in the form of official development assistance (ODA).

Some worlds experts are suggesting, “...the next world war will be fought over water and food.”

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Worldwide WEB: (see Internet)

"Two-thirds of all sites and half of all internet users are American." – Internet Watch Foundation, England

Only 2.4% of the world's population is on the internet today. One of 40. The internet has thus far accentuated the gap between rich and poor countries. In South-East Asia one person in 200 is linked to the internet, while in Africa only one in 1,000 is an internet user.

Security Issues and Privacy Issues. Corporations and Governments monitoring of web users. Cookies and newer technologies of monitoring users are being invented and used to keep an eye on employees and citizens.

George Bush, "Americans are going to have to give up some of their rights they take for granted." (statement during the campaign for President in April 2000)

The large corporations are designing a new "Internet II" and charge everybody for it. No more free internet is a possibility in the future.

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Violence against Women:

"Every 12 seconds a woman is beaten in America"

"50% of the women beaten are pregnant"

"Every 8 minutes a woman is raped in America"

"Every 6 hours a woman is killed in America"

"Domestic violence is the No. 1 cause of Hospital Emergency Room visits in America"

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IAED looks for, and works towards, positive solutions to these problems wherever they exist in the world.

If you are interested in helping us, please contact us.

We are working on this list....

If we have missed any critical ones...please let us know.


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